Latest by Elizabeth Wiggin

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Responsibility of a parent company for the acts of its subsidiary

Published on 12 June 2017. By Elizabeth Wiggin, Associate and Jonathan Wood, Head of International Arbitration

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The Court provided helpful analysis of the circumstances in which a parent company owes a duty of care with regard to operations carried out by its subsidiary. The case is interesting to examine in the context of the readiness of the English courts to hear claims relating to conduct outside of the jurisdiction brought by foreign claimants.

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Court of Appeal sheds light on innocent party's right to affirm frustrated contract

Published on 08 November 2016. By Elizabeth Wiggin, Associate and Stuart Shepherd, Partner

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Court of Appeal held that the innocent party could not affirm a contract once its commercial purpose had been frustrated in order to claim on-going damages.

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The new 'notification injunction'

Published on 15 June 2016. By Elizabeth Wiggin, Associate and Jonathan Wood, Head of International Arbitration

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In Holyoake v Candy the High Court considered the court's power to grant a "notification injunction" requiring the Defendants to give written notice before disposing or dealing with their assets. The decision is of interest to applicants seeking an alternative to a freezing injunction where there is concern that a respondent may deal with their assets so as to frustrate the enforcement of any future judgment.

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Privacy rights when you don’t expect them - the case of JR38

Published on 03 July 2015. By Elizabeth Wiggin, Associate

Yesterday, the Supreme Court unanimously dismissed an appeal by an Appellant involved in rioting in Derry in 2014.

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Google v Vidal-Hall: the rise and rise of data protection rights

Published on 31 March 2015. By Elizabeth Wiggin, Associate

In an important decision handed down on Friday, the Court of Appeal confirmed that misuse of private information is a tort, and that claimants may recover damages under the Data Protection Act 1998 (the "DPA") for distress without also proving pecuniary losses.

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